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storytelling

Managing team culture from the inside out

By Advocate, Leader

In January I wrote about the magic lever of organizational culture change (link). Today I’m preparing for a nursing leadership seminar about organizational culture and change for people who lead teams in much larger organizations. While I mostly want to hear from the participants – sharing experiences has much more value than anything I could share – I have the following pearls:

  1. Be the ideal – act as you expect others to act – the golden rule. Simple but tough. You have most control of this
  2. Hire for culture – You can train skills, but you can’t train for attitude. The best opportunity is at hiring.
  3. Leverage diversity -build different skills, ways of thinking (Myers-Briggs), and life experiences into your team. 
  4. Experiment, learn with your teams – who knows what will work? Try stuff out. If it doesn’t work try something else
  5. Engage patients & caregivers – it’s the right thing to do, but it also changes the conversation dramatically 
  6. Be transparent with information – Whether you have grade A or grade C data – share it. Let people comment, criticize, engage. Tell stories. Welcome scrutiny.
  7. Market the change – You can’t change everything or everyone, but you can change the people who matter (the link takes you to Seth Godin’s blog)
What do you think?

Book review: Far from the Tree

By Advocate, Caregiver, ePatient, Family man

Andrew Solomon’s Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity covers stories of diverse caregiver experience; parents with exceptional children: children with deafness, dwarfism, Downs syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, or disability. Others are caring for children who are prodigies, transgender, conceived from rape, or committing crimes. It is a rich and exhausting tome (962 pages) — profoundly sad, exhilarating, and inspiring. Solomon interviews more than 300 families navigating a journey they didn’t choose, caring for their children, facing unexpected challenges. What can those of us committed to participatory medicine learn from their experience?

More? See the full review here in the Journal for Participatory Medicine
van Leeuwen D. Book review: Far From the Tree. J Participat Med. 2013 Feb 18; 5:e8.

Scents of Commonality

By Caregiver, Consumer, ePatient, Family man
I am the child of holocaust survivors. Recently I’m hearing more about my mother’s life as a German Jew in hiding in Netherlands for her teen years. It strikes me as an empowered, engaged ePatient how our different life situations change the meaning of ePatient. In her case, survival was paramount, then boredom and fear. Isn’t that health? She tells about surgery for my grandfather on a kitchen table. Wasn’t she an ePatient? What I think of as health is very different. I am white, comfortable, loved, with little fear. I’m a worried well person with a chronic disease. I focus on other portions of the health continuum: meds, appointments, weight, diet, balance, stamina. My friend Cristin Lind’s blog Durgatoolbox dramatizes this lopsided continuum in her son’s care map.  The similarity for each scenario is that best health is hugely more than medical institutions address. No matter how much I try, I can’t get my brain around what my mother experienced. I can’t get my brain around what Cristin and her family experience.  Yet I can pull threads of understanding, empathy, compassion. Scents of our commonality. How do we share ourselves as we are ePatients? How can we help professionals on our teams pull those threads, whiff those scents?

Rest – another magic lever

By Clinician

I’m on vacation with my family on Cape Cod, playing, eating, napping, and swimming. For best health we need rejuvenation. All components of individual health: spiritual, mental, and physical, depend on rest and relaxation. These days most healthcare organizations exist in a constant state of change. Change is seldom restful. I suspect organizations need rest and rejuvenation for their best health. The front line bears the brunt with interrupted work flow and changes in staffing and technology. Those touching our patients, clients, consumers feel less worn when they can depend on a steady routine of care and service. One of the hardest jobs of leadership is to care for the front line so they don’t burn out. We can set realistic timelines, support flexibility in hours to promote work/life balance, and make sure that changes at least make some of the work easier. We can promote positive storytelling that links staff back to the mission – why they do the work they do. What a dilemma: ever shifting environmental challenges necessitates the constant change that exhausts staff.

How does your organization rest and rejuvenate?